Archives for posts with tag: talent

Bruce the BossWhile observing Bruce Springsteen’s E-Street Band’s recent induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, I observed “The Boss” as a genuine and caring leader in action.

Bruce exhibited multiple leadership traits, including:

  1. demonstrate great passion for what you’re doing and how you do it
  2. create a fun working environment for all stakeholders involved
  3. surround yourself with the best talent available (his E-Street band includes awesomely skilled musicians)
  4. exhibit non-stop high energy that creates infectious enthusiasm
  5. be unselfish and empower your team to perform their part
  6. appreciate and acknowledge the importance of everyone on the team

Not surprisingly, the majority of this tribe has been together for decades, following the same leader with an unrivaled camaraderie and success that most leadership could only dream of achieving!

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Bruce the BossWhile observing Bruce Springsteen’s E-Street Band’s recent induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, I observed “The Boss” as a genuine and caring leader in action.

Bruce exhibited multiple leadership traits, including:

  1. demonstrate great passion for what you’re doing and how you do it
  2. create a fun working environment for all stakeholders involved
  3. surround yourself with the best talent available (his E-Street band includes awesomely skilled musicians)
  4. exhibit non-stop high energy that creates infectious enthusiasm
  5. be unselfish and empower your team to perform their part
  6. appreciate and acknowledge the importance of everyone on the team

Not surprisingly, the majority of this tribe has been together for decades, following the same leader with an unrivaled camaraderie and success that most leadership could only dream of achieving!

retention

Retaining your employees is step four in the ongoing Talent process cycle we’ve been discussing.

You’ve committed the resources to ensure you now have the right quantity and quality of people while providing the required training, development and coaching to promote their success.  So now, in this current state business world of job shopping and hopping, how do we get our team to stick around?

A 2013 article in Forbes noted that the average tenure of an employee in the U.S. is now only 1.5 years! The top six reasons that talent leaves their organization is:

  1. No Vision: this should be known and lived by everyone in any organization!
  2. No Connection to the Big Picture: what’s my purpose and why am I here?
  3. No Empathy: managers don’t openly communicate and listen to their people.
  4. No Effective Motivation: the false belief that financial compensation is a sufficient incentive to engage top talent and drive performance.
  5. No Future: a career path and succession planning is non-existent (reinforced in the introductory Talent “Four-Step” post)
  6. No Fun: this is pretty self-explanatory!

WOW…if this list doesn’t validate that people quit due to poor leadership!

Rewards, recognition, compensation and benefits are certainly important to retention, but perhaps even more essential are the six elements noted above.

If Human capital is indeed the most important asset of any business, than let this serve as an initial checklist of what to look for in your operation should you expect to retain your top talent.

 

Talent 4 step

Talent 4 step

During the Talent “Four-Step” introductory blog, I noted the importance of human capital towards  achieving desired organizational goals and objectives.

The “plan” component of this Talent process cycle is the obvious starting point in determining the current and future staffing needs for your operations.  The human resource scheme must align with the overall strategic plan of an organization.

It seems that in our personal and professional lives, we tend to operate in a reactive rather than proactive, or properly planned, mode. When it comes to human resource management, this can lead to disaster in terms of productivity, growth and culture.

In leading a business, the talent strategy must identify exactly who will be required to optimize results, in terms of both the quality and quantity of employees.

Our next stop, a proper sourcing process, can then be developed based on the clearly identified people needs.